Why Republicans need to stand tall for the unborn now 1


By Tom Quiner

FACT #1: Last week’s election swung on economic issues.

FACT #2: Last week’s election also swung on concerns over runaway big government.

Wouldn’t you say those were two of the biggies?

So here is my question: were social issues such as abortion and traditional marriage issues? Of course they were, but not as big as the two above. I pose this question in light of a comment I read from the incoming Florida State Senate Leader Mike Haridopolos that appeared in the Florida Today newpaper:

“On supporting Nebraska-style abortion limits:  “If this bill is pursued by a member, it will be given the normal committee structure and it will have to work through it, and get an up or down vote.  But what I can promise you is that where my focus is and where Dean’s and Rick’s [Scott, new Governor of Florida] is, is on the economy.

Folks who have all kinds of social issues, can work through the process.  If you can get it through the process, you’ll get an up or down vote, I want us to make fact-based decisions.”

Translation: we’re not going out of our way for life issues.

Mr. Haridopolos may not speak for all Republicans. Nonetheless, I point out his comments in light of a comment from the pro-life activists group, the Susan B. Anthony list:

“The percentage of women in the House of Representatives who are pro-life increased by 60 percent while the percentage of women who are pro-choice decreased by 16 percent.”

Hmm … is there a trend here? The whole country is becoming more pro life day by day.

So, to my Republican friends and elected officials who are solidly pro-life, your belief in the sanctity of life leads to another fact:

FACT #3: The human fetus is a human being entitled to full human rights.

How could anything be more important than protecting human dignity? Do not brush this issue aside. Yes, taxes and government spending and the economy and health care are huge issues. But they’re not more important than an inalienable right to life, are they?

Let me leave you with an economic reason to pass legislation to protect the unborn. When social security was passed, we had about 30 taxpayers for every person receiving benefits. Today we have but three, and tomorrow we will have but two for every person receiving benefits. If we hadn’t aborted close to 40 million babies in the last 37 years, we wouldn’t have the social security crisis we have today because we’d have more people supporting the program.

In other words, America is paying an economic price for abandoning its foundational principal of a right to life.

Republicans, this is your opportunity to stand up for life. If you don’t, who will?

 

 

 

 

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The root cause of poverty Reply


By Tom Quiner

I heard it said once that avoiding poverty is really pretty easy. You have to do three things:

1. Graduate from high school.

2. Defer child-rearing until your twenties.

3. Get a job. Any job, even if it’s flipping hamburgers. It will lead to a better job, and then an even better job.

The Associated Press (AP) just came out with a story that talked about the tremendous toll unwed motherhood is having on the African-American community. A stunning 72 percent of African-American children are born to unwed mothers.

AP listed the out-of-wedlock rate by race, as follows …

Asian: 17%

White: 29%

Hispanic: 53%

Black: 72%

Interestingly, income inequality by race somewhat mirrors the ranking above, only Hispanics earn a little less than blacks on average. Below is U.S. Census median annual income by race from 2006:

Asian: $36,152

White: $32,919

Black: $27,110

Hispanic: $23,613

These income rankings suggest that out-of-wedlock rates may correlate with median average income rates.

It makes sense. Women who have babies without husbands often find themselves in over their heads trying to raise their children and put food on the table. That’s why the majority of people on welfare are single Moms.

A disproportionate percentage don’t graduate from high school.

A disproportionate percentage can’t get a job, any job.

Income gaps are frequently politicized, the claim being that they are primarily the result of discrimination. The numbers above suggest family structure is the biggest issue.

President Obama’s election in 2008 revealed the truth about America, that we are moving beyond race. People of all colors voted for Mr. Obama’s message of “hope and change.”

And yet, here we are a couple years later and black unemployment rates are 29% according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and unemployment rates for black youth between the ages of 16 and 19 is 48 percent.

Democrats’ hostility to small business has dealt a serious blow to black entrepreneurs.

The black abortion rate is one out of every three pregnancies.

Nothing is going right for black America, even with a black President. As a result, black voter turnout plunged in last week’s election.

Despite the fact that Republicans ran 14 black candidates for Congress and got two of them elected, the NAACP smeared the Tea Party Movement with charges of racism.

How counterproductive.

The root cause of poverty is primarily family structure. It is exacerbated by job-killing liberal policies promoted and passed by the President and his party. As political columnist Star Parker (an African-American) states it:

Star Parker

“We have arrived in post-racial America but establishment blacks – lodged in the political left – refuse to accept it and are doing all they can to get black citizens to refuse to accept it.

The sobering reality is that the black political establishment doesn’t want Dr. King’s dream. They don’t want an America where people are judged by the content of their character. They want an America that is Democrat and left wing and this is what they promote today under the banner of civil rights.”

Another columnist, Lurita Doan, also African-American said:

Lurita Doan, former administrator of the General Services Administration

“Black Americans, like many Americans, were proud of the “post-racial” president, a feat which many of us had not believed would occur in our lifetime.  But, as president, Obama, a man who is clearly bright, articulate and intellectual, has appeared to be excessively anti-business, ignorant of the basic workings of government, inexperienced in the kind of leadership necessary to bring different factions to consensus, and incapable of putting together a team to fill in the gaps of his inexperience.

These failures have been disappointing to many Americans, but perhaps most painful to the Black community who may have hoped that the first African American president would turn out to be the stuff that dreams are made of, answering to a higher calling than just the petty politics of partisanship and trying to achieve more for all Americans rather than just focusing on getting himself re-elected.”

The potential in the African-American community is staggering. The tragedy is that this potential is being squandered, and an African-American President isn’t helping them a darn bit.

Death of a composer 1


By Tom Quiner

His name may not be on the tip of your tongue, but his music is. The great Broadway composer, Jerry Bock died this week at the age of 81.

He wrote the music to what is arguably the most beloved musical in Broadway history, Fiddler on the Roof. And if you don’t agree with that assessment, at least concede that the lead character, the beleaguered father, Tevye, is the most beloved Broadway character ever.

Quiner’s Diner pays tribute to this composer who enriched the world with his beautiful music. I’ve posted two of his greatest songs for your enjoyment.

Two explanations for the President’s inexplicable remark 2


By Tom Quiner

In the summer of 2009, angry voters crammed into townhall meetings with their Senators and Congressman. They expressed in no uncertain terms their concerns about the health care legislation being advanced by the Democratic Party.

They were against it.

They responded in three critical off-year elections by defeating candidates in Virginia, New Jersey, and Massachusetts by convincing margins. These were districts that had voted for President Obama not that long ago.

The wedge issue was the Democrat’s plan for health insurance. Candidates who opposed the Democrat’s proposed expansion of the federal government won. Turnout was high. The result was unmistakably a vote against what is now dubbed “Obamacare.”

Despite polling data that showed voters opposed the plan, Democrats crammed the legislation through in a partisan fashion. Not one Republican voted for the legislation.

Voters got their chance to express their views on Obamacare this week. They voted Republican, giving Republicans historic gains in the House, the Senate, Governorships, and the State Legislatures.

No Democrats campaigned touting their vote for Obamacare. Every Republican campaigned in opposition.

That leads me to the President’s take on the election:

“We’d be misreading the election if we thought the American people want to see us for the next two years re-litigate arguments we had over the last two years.”

In light of overwhelming evidence to the contrary, how could the President so misread the electorate? There are two explanations. One could be that he is not very bright. There are people who are book smart but not people smart. Maybe Mr. Obama is just not very good at reading people.

Or there is another explanation. Maybe he doesn’t care. In his press conference on Wednesday, he maintained that his policies were good, but that a lot of folks just hadn’t studied the issues closely enough.

Translation: the voters are stupid.

Translation: he knows what’s best for us, someday we’ll thank him for his superior wisdom.

And yet I read this morning that here in Iowa, Wellmark Blue Cross has suspended the sale of their “child-only policies.” Why? Because Obamacare banned insurers from denying coverage to children with pre-existing conditions.

And yet I read today that AARP, a big supporter of Obamacare, is forced to raise health insurance costs to their employees by 8 to 13 percent because of the healthcare overhaul.

And yet I read today that Boeing is doing the same because of coming new taxes on high-cost health insurance plans.

Voters reject Obamacare for good reasons, and President Obama doesn’t care. He thinks he knows best.

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[I may be critical of our President’s policies, but I pray for his safety during his trip to India.]