A spot of tea in Indianola 4


By Lisa Bourne

I attended the Tea Party of America’s Restoring America event in at the National Balloon Classic grounds in Indianola, IA on Saturday, September 3.

Sarah Palin in Indianola, Iowa

Former Alaska Governor and 2008 Republican vice-presidential candidate Sarah Palin was the keynote speaker at the event. Despite previous reports that she would not announce her candidacy for the 2012 presidential election at the rally, on the off-chance she might do so, I thought it would be interesting to be there.

I also wanted to take in my second Tea Party event.

After my two Tea Party encounters  I remain convinced that the negative aspersions cast on the movement by the media and some politicians and others are complete fabrication. At both I saw regular, hard-working people who are patriotic and love our country. At the same time, they are unhappy about what’s happening here and abroad at the hands of and in the name of our nation’s government.

Sarah Palin gave a speech that was well-written and delivered at the Restoring America rally.

The woman is also much maligned by the media and others.

What’s not for the cranky to hate?

She’s beautiful. She’s likable. She’s down-to-earth. She’s accomplished. She seems thoroughly genuine, and she’s beat the feminists at their own game by “having it all,” minus the anger.

For me, Sarah Palin’s character has never been more evident than in her rejecting the notion of taking the life of her son Trig while he was in his mother’s womb waiting to be born, as is all too customary with Down’s Syndrome children anymore.

And yet, what’s the story on her candidacy?

For all the petty vitriol blasted her way, even those who aren’t among the haters can find her posturing as a candidate without officially jumping in tiresome.

Sarah Palin had a good message at the Restoring America rally, substantive as any campaign speech, which is what it clearly had to be. I think she’ll announce soon, and she’s got an army of grassroots supporters ready to fall in formation when she does.

However I agree with the perspective I was recently offered by a friend: She can be of greater value to the conservative cause if she continues to use her influence on various issues and candidates rather than becoming a candidate herself.

Additional comparing of Sarah Palin’s level of executive experience to that of Barack Obama going into the 2008 election, or acknowledging the media’s conducting a war on her words while simultaneously constructing the president as he-of-the-golden-tongue, would not advance the discussion.

Recognizing that we’re operating on the assumption that any number of choices would result in better than we have now, Sarah Palin is certainly among those many choices.

However, while we absolutely have somebody to vote against, we absolutely need somebody to vote for.

As a Catholic I’m pulling for Senator Rick Santorum.

Rick Santorum

Experience, good on the issues, a proven record in office and yet, outside the Republican establishment.

In a world where politicians whom a Catholic can support in good conscience are few and far between, I find Rick Santorum a breath of much needed fresh air.

Life, the family, marriage, faith, our country; all among the things Rick Santorum has pledged to continue to fight for. You can get a glimpse at http://www.ricksantorum.com/why-rick.

Again, something key for me; while he’s been a successful public servant, he’s a devoted husband and father, the man has his family with him whenever he can.

Senator Santorum and wife Karen are the parents of one child in heaven and seven children here on earth. The Santorum’s youngest child, Isabella, three, has Trisomy 18, a condition where the vast majority of children do not survive past birth. The family is walking the walk when it comes to life.

See more here:  http://blogs.cbn.com/thebrodyfile/archive/2011/03/28/senator-santorum-cancelled-iowa-trip-because-daughter-was-very-ill.aspx.

It is my hope that more people will continue to hear Rick Santorum’s message, even get to meet him, that support for him will resonate so his candidacy grows, and then we can get on with the business of restoring America.

[Thanks to Lisa Bourne for contributing this article and photos to Quiner’s Diner. Ms. Bourne is a Catholic journalist and pro-life wife and mother.]

John the Baptist. Barack Obama. Melissa Ohden. Rick Santorum. 1


By Tom Quiner

John the Baptist and Jesus

Do you know who John the Baptist is?

The Catholic Church considers him the greatest and last in the line of the prophets.

He was the voice in the wilderness paving the way for Jesus, the Christ.

He did something interesting while still in his mother’s womb. I quote the King James Bible, the book of Luke 1:41:

“And it came to pass, that, when Elisabeth heard the salutation of Mary, the babe leaped in her womb; and Elisabeth was filled with the Holy Ghost.”

Scripture suggests personhood for the Baptist even when he was in the womb, that he had an awareness of another person, Jesus, while He was still in his Mother Mary’s womb.

Contemporary Americans in this political cycle should contemplate these two historical figures, both of whom are “giants” in the world of Christianity.

Consider the possibilities:

1. A baby leaping in the womb at the precise moment another fetus is present may be just a fluke of timing.  Let’s face it, babies are moving and kicking in the Mom’s womb at six months. John may have let out a kick at just the moment the pregnant Mary walked up. No big deal, right?

2. The writer may have romanticized the whole encounter or made it up.

3. John and Jesus were portrayed as persons while in the womb, their human potential revealed as immediately significant.

It is this third possibility that is at issue today.

My question to you contemporary Americans is: is the human potential of the baby in the womb significant?

Pastor Rick Warren asked then-candidate Barack Obama: “At what point does a baby get human rights, in your view?” The future President was evasive:

“Well, you know,” he said, “I think that whether you’re looking at it from a theological perspective or a scientific perspective, answering that question with specificity, you know, is above my pay grade.”

In other words, Mr. Obama suggested that human rights are subjective, not inalienable, a view not unlike those held in communist China.

Human rights are conditional and determined by people in power.

Mr. Obama was put to the test on this issue while a state senator in Illinois. The legislature was attempting to pass a law that would require health care workers to save the life of a baby “born alive,” one that survived an abortion.

Without that law, the fetus (now a baby) would be left to die without treatment or comforting, something we wouldn’t even do to a dog.

This is what happened to Melissa Ohden as Quiner’s Diner recounted on Monday. Ms.

Abortion survivor, Melissa Ohden with her little girl

Ohden was aborted when she was a 5-month old fetus.

She survived.

Iowa law demanded medical treatment, which she received.

Mr. Obama would not have provided that treatment. He recognized the pitfalls of “Born Alive” legislation. He recognized that it would put his pro-abortion political supporters at some risk, because it would become rather challenging to offer human rights to the Melissa Ohdens of the world only if she could survive the abortionist’s assault on her little body.

What is the difference between Melissa Ohden in the womb and Melissa Ohden lying on a table fighting for breath five minutes later?

Tough call. Let’s face it, there is no difference. Mr. Obama said:

“(T)he Equal Protection Clause does not allow someone to kill a child, and if this is a child, then this would be an anti-abortion statute.”

There you have it.

By characterizing a statute as “anti-abortion,” Mr. Obama revealed that his political ties to a powerful (and financially supportive) political lobby trumped Melissa Ohden’s life.

Human rights are conditional to this, America’s first African-American, President.

Rick Santorum

This is where presidential candidate, Rick Santorum comes in. Mr. Santorum has displayed a great deal of courage during his political career in defense of life.

He stakes out politically unpopular positions, and sticks to them, no matter how much it costs him politically.

Mr. Santorum staked out a position similar to one Martin Luther King Jr. stated while the latter was in a Birmingham jail. Mr. King said a law is just if comports with natural law, and it was unjust if it didn’t. He said segregation was unjust because it didn’t comport with natural law.

Mr. Santorum sees a similarity when considering human rights for the pre-born:

“Every person, every child conceived in the womb has a right to life from the moment of conception,” said Santorum. “Why? Because they are human, genetically human, at the moment of conception … so it’s a human life. I don’t think you’ll find a biologist in the world who will say that that is not a human life. The question is — and this is what Barack Obama didn’t want to answer — is that human life a person under the Constitution? And Barack Obama says no. Well, if that person, human life, is not a person, then I find it almost remarkable for a black man to say: No, we are going to decide who are people and who are not people.”

Melissa Ohden shared a rather unpleasant experience when speaking to a woman’s group. A representative from a well-known abortion provider was present. Melissa went up to her after speaking and extended her hand. The abortion provider refused to take it, turned her back on her, and walked away.

Ms. Ohden should have been dead. She had no right to be there talking, did she?

The president demurred when questioned by Rick Warren on when does a baby get human rights.

He wasn’t shooting straight with us.

It is up to him, he is saying in a sense. It’s up to men and women like him to determine when human rights shall be dispensed based on politics, not natural law.

On the other hand, Rick Santorum says human rights occur at conception, that it is not up to man, that it is not up to the Party to determine these things. He says that human life is immediately significant regardless of where it resides.

As I wrote in my post yesterday, courageous leaders are a rare commodity. Rick Santorum has it in spades.