Why voters are cynical 1


By Tom Quiner

Voters hate to be manipulated.

The faux commercial above is funny because it smacks of some truth.  Take the current budget debate. Nine days ago, the Congressional Budget Office made a dire prediction:  America is going to experience long term red ink like we haven’t seen since World War II.  We have a growing crisis.  So what is our leadership in Congress doing about it?

Nothing.  They refuse to pass a budget.  Rather than presenting the usual five year fiscal blueprint, the House passed a non-binding one year budget “resolution.”

Even Pulitzer prize-winning journalist, David Broder, who is no conservative, is stunned by the depth of the Democrats’ chutzpa.  He describe it this way:

For all the publicity that goes to earmarks and other spending gimmicks, this was a far worst dereliction of duty. And the cynicism of the maneuver just made it worse.

Speaker Pelosi, no stranger to chutzpa, said Democrat’s dereliction of duty was “another step in restoring fiscal responsiblity.”

Do you remember how these same people railed (with justification) against President’s Bush’s profligacy?  Now they are not only spending us into an abyss from which we may never extricate ourselves, they are refusing to step up to the plate and present a responsible budget.

Republican Paul Ryan is one politician who has stepped up to the plate and presented a responsible budget proposal (ignored by Democrats).  Here is what he said of Democrats’ budget resolution:

“This is not a budget. The measure fails to meet the most basic, commonly understood objectives of any budget. It does not set congressional priorities; it does not align overall spending, tax, deficit and debt levels; and it does nothing to address the runaway spending of federal entitlement programs.”

Honest differences of opinions exist between the two parties on various issues. Nothing wrong with that. That’s politics.  That’s America.  But Democrat’s refusal to present a budget isn’t honorable.  It’s called political cowardice.  And it breeds nothing but cynicism.

Democrats owe Americans an honest budget Reply


By Tom Quiner

Is America heading in the right direction or the wrong direction?

According to poll results at www.RealClearPolitics.com, 61.7 percent of Americans say we’re heading in the wrong direction.  One year ago, the number was 48 percent.

Why is dissatisfaction growing?

Certainly some of the biggest concerns are runaway deficits and the unprecedented expansion of the federal government under President Obama and a Democratic Congress.

Moderate Americans are worried:  how can we possibly afford all the new spending and all of the new unionized government employees the President has added to the government payroll?

What could the President and Congress do to instill some confidence with the American people?  They could submit a balanced budget to the American people.

They could submit a budget that shows new fiscal restraint in government spending.

They could submit a budget that shows Americans we’re on a path back to solvency.

The President and Congress won’t do it.  Even more, they refuse to even submit a budget at all.

Let me put it in perspective.  The Democrats have escalated government spending way beyond the Bush years, way beyond anything America has ever seen.  The only question is whether Obama deficits will triple or quadruple Bush’s deficits from 2008 (although it is only fair to mention that Democrats also controlled Congressional purse strings since 2006).

Now Democrats are totally in charge.  What have they done?  They broke the bank and refuse to even offer up a budget of any sort for 2011.

We’re witnessing a repugnant act of political cowardice.  House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer excuses their refusal to craft a budget on the grounds that it isn’t possible without the input of a “deficit commission” assembled by the President that won’t offer budget suggestions until, you guessed it, after the midterm elections in November.

My response is simple:  Congress spends the money; they’re ones who got us into this mess with assistance from the President; they owe it to the voters to present a budget now as they have historically done.

Grover Norquist, who heads Americans for Tax Reform, says, “It makes it appear that the whole point of the deficit commission from day one was to hide from what Congress is really doing and let Congressman run in the November election claiming to be for some imaginary budget restraint that they’re not actually ready to vote for.”

In other words, the whole thing is a con, once again at taxpayer expense.

Senator Judd Gregg, ranking member of the Senate Budget Committee, put it this way:  “The majority simply doesn’t want to highlight to the American people how much unpaid-for spending is planned for the next ten years, and how staggering our deficits will be as a result.”

Democrats have controlled government purse strings for three and a half years.  They owe the American people an honest budget for next year.  They need to show us how they plan to undo the structural damage they have done to our nation’s finances.

Their refusal to do so explains why 61.7 percent of Americans believe we’re headed in the wrong direction.

Their refusal explains why a staggering 71 percent of Americans (according to RealClearPolitics.com) disapprove of the job Congress is doing.